GoldenQuest™ has been donating dogs for all types of work for over thirty years.  Our first therapy dog went to nursing homes and became Kansas Dog of the Year.  We have donated dogs for physical support, hearing alert, guide work, seizure alert, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), emotional support, schools, nursing homes, therapists, and medical detection in a cancer screening program.  We have also had multiple dogs used in various service dog breeding programs.

We continue to offer service dogs – a service dog is one that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability.  Before you request a service dog, you need to understand your needs and what a service dog has to offer you.  If your need requires physical support for mobility assistance, we would suggest our golden retrievers.  Our goldens participate in our health and longevity program.  We have produced many service dogs with our golden retriever lines.

If you need a service dog for a non physical support task, we suggest that you consider our Comfort Retrievers®.  We feel that they may be the perfect service dog for non-mobility tasks.  Our Comfort Retrievers® have the wonderful temperament and willingness to learn of a golden retriever.  The poodle infusion gives them increased intelligence, reduced size, and some hypoallergenic and reduced shedding traits.  Our Comforts®  also have a coat that is much easier to handle than a poodle’s or a traditional goldendoodle.  With our health and longevity program, we believe that our dogs will on average be healthier, live longer, and have a much longer service life than a lab, golden retriever and most other service dogs.  Our goal is to breed dogs that age gracefully and don’t have the common disorders like osteoarthritis that afflicts many breeds as they age.  In addition, the Comfort’s® structure and temperament should produce a low ‘fear factor’ for the members of the community that have dog fears.

There is a great need for quality dogs that have the potential to be service dogs. We try to help the community with two programs.

Our first program involves donating service dogs.  In order to qualify for a service dog, you need to have a medically verified condition.  You need to find a qualified trainer that will train or oversee your training program for your dog.  Finding a trainer can be very difficult, so we ask that you contact us for a donated service dog only after you have a trainer lined up and have assessed the tasks you need for your dog to perform.   Normally we ask that the dog we donate to you remains in our breeding program for up to 3 successful litters.   Although this will mean some down time from you service dog program it allows us to breed to the most successful service dogs and improve our program for other service dog recipients.   It also allows you to get cash back.   Any costs incurred related to breeding is paid for by us.

Our second program involves you purchasing your potential service dog at our normal pet price.  You need to make us aware that the puppy is intended to be a service dog.  You can be rebated 50% of the purchase price minus $100.  The requirements to get the rebate are:

  1. Pass the CGC http://www.akc.org/events/cgc/program.cfm offered by the AKC.  We suggest that minimally you train your dog to pass the minimum standard for service dogs (http://www.deltasociety.org/document.doc?id=373) but don’t mandate it.
  2. Show proof that your dog offers a service to assist your disability.  Either an approved service dog trainer (http://www.deltasociety.org/page.aspx?pid=452)  needs to observe and verify this or a video can be sent to our service dog trainer.  The task your dog will perform will be agreed upon at the time the puppy is purchased.
  3. Allow us to post a photo of the owner or dog team and a brief description of the tasks performed by the dog on our web site.
  4. The dog needs to be twenty-six months of age or younger at the time of testing.

For every ten pups sold we are willing to donate up to one service dog.  There is limited availability of dogs for the service dog program.